Washington State University Extension

Carbon Masters™

Carbon Masters

To find out more about Carbon Masters™ in King, Snohomish or Whatcom Counties, click on the county and you will be directed to the corresponding website.

Faculty and staff in King, Snohomish and Whatcom County are working to develop a volunteer based program, Carbon Masters™.  This program will provide individuals, communities and the environments they live in, with trained volunteers who have had interdisciplinary based education to help citizens, business leaders and local officials make informed decisions about the most effective choices concerning their carbon usage while pointing out key strategies for confronting the impacts of climate change.

Washington State University and its partners are in a unique position to change public behavior to reduce dependency on greenhouse-gas releasing activities and convey ways to adapt to the effects of climate change over the next few decades.  WSU Extension, through Carbon Masters™, will engage local communities on multiple levels through educational programs, training, community outreach, and by facilitating a coordinated response to the highest priority public issues. 

WSU Extension, with the support of WSU faculty and students, research stations, and partners - has a broad array of scientific and technical expertise to support programming on climate change.  Programs include the Extension Energy Program, Beach Watchers/Watershed Masters, Master Gardeners, Master Compost/Recyclers, Climate Friendly Farming, Forest Stewardship, Family Living, 4-H youth development and the Climate Change Distance Degree Program being done in conjunction with the National Wildlife Federation.  These programs engage the public in their homes, churches, schools, businesses and recreating spaces.  Partnerships in education and research include the University of Washington Climate Impacts Group, county governments, state agencies, federal government and private industry.

Why Carbon Masters™

The climate in Washington State is changing as the planet is warming.  Scientists have documented that increasing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere surrounding earth are raising global temperatures.  Dependence on snow pack for stream flows, hydropower, irrigation and drinking water, along with expected rising sea levels make Washington especially vulnerable to climate change driven by carbon usage.  For example, research is documenting that higher temperatures are elevating sea levels, changing near shore habitat and impacting fisheries, as well as homeowners.  Seasonal snow packs are melting sooner, increasing flooding and reducing fresh drinking water and hydropower resource availability in summer.  The make-up of our food crops, landscapes, and natural resources are changing with the climate.  Everyone will be affected by Climate Change.

The Board of Directors of the American Association for the Advancement of Science have stated:

“The scientific evidence is clear: global climate change caused by human activities is occurring now, and it is a growing threat to society. Accumulating data from across the globe reveal a wide array of effects: rapidly melting glaciers, destabilization of major ice sheets, increases in extreme weather, rising sea level, shifts in species ranges, and more. The pace of change and the evidence of harm have increased markedly over the last five years. The time to control greenhouse gas emissions is now… Delaying action to address climate change will increase the environmental and societal consequences as well as the costs. The longer we wait to tackle climate change, the harder and more expensive the task will be.”

Governor Christine Gregoire, in her Executive Order, Washington’s Climate Change Challenge illustrated that the everyday actions and decisions of individuals, businesses and government are the biggest determinant of our future climate change impacts.  Global fossil fuel use is pushing the levels of carbon dioxide, the primary greenhouse gas, to higher and higher levels.  Currently there is no technological fix for removing significant amounts of carbon from the atmosphere, so reducing the impacts of climate change will rely heavily on changing how communities, organizations and government use carbon-based energy resources and natural carbon sinks in their everyday activities.  Scientific projections show the sooner that humans can reduce their reliance on carbon-releasing activities, the sooner that the global atmospheric temperatures can stabilize.  Learning how to mitigate and adapt to increasing amounts of climate change over the next 30 to 50 years will also be critical.

Secondary content using h2 tag. Column 2

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Heading using the h3tag

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Department or office , PO Box 640000, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164-0000, 509-335-0000, Contact Us